Research in Progress

The RIP series provides an informal forum for computational biologists to keep abreast of colleagues' projects, to help students and postdocs hone their presentation skills, and to get expert feedback on new projects. The forum is targeted towards anyone working at the interface of Biology and Analytical sciences. CBBG students are strongly encouraged to present. These meetings will be held in room #3118 Biomolecular Sciences Building (#296) Thursdays from 3-5pm, unless otherwise noted. There will be two presentations, approximately 30 minutes each with time for open discussion and socializing.

**If you are interested in speaking on an open date, or if you need to cancel or reschedule, please contact Max Leiserson and inform Barbara Lewis when you are scheduled to give a presentation.
CBCB Fall 2014 RIP Schedule

Spring Semester 2019

Date

Speaker

Fac/
Postdoc/
Grad

PI/Lab/Host

Topic & Abstract

Time (if other than 3pm)

3/28/19

Kuoyuan Cheng

Grad

Ruppin Lab

Synthetic lethality is a strong determinant of cancer risk across human tissues
Abstract: Considerable variation exists in lifetime cancer risk across human tissues, which has been reported to be strongly correlated with the number of stem cell divisions and with abnormal DNA methylation levels occurring in a tissue. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that the number of down-regulated synthetic lethal (SL) gene pairs in a tissue (termed its SL load) is another strong determinant of its cancer risk. We show that the SL load of normal tissues is higher than that of the cancers that originate from them, and that SL load of early-stage tumors is higher than that of late-stage ones. These findings testify that many SLs are lost during these transitions, and lead to the hypothesis that high SL load in normal tissues may impede cancer development. Accordingly, we find that normal tissues with high SL load have less risk of developing cancer than tissues with low SL load. Notably, tissues with high SL load also develop cancer at later ages than tissues with low SL load. The SLs lost in the transition from healthy to cancer tissues tend to be the functionally stronger ones. Overall, our findings highlight the significant role of synthetic lethality in determining cancer risk and onset time across human tissues.

4/11/19

Nicholas Rachmaninoff

Grad

Corrada-Bravo Lab

Systems Immunology of Monogenic Immune Disorders

4/11/19

Domenick Braccia

Grad

Corrada-Bravo Lab

TBA

4/18/19

Cindy Li

Grad

Leiserson Lab

TBA

4/18/19

David Crawford

Grad

Ruppin/Mount Lab

TBA

5/2/19

Saul Sarria

Grad

Pop Lab

TBA

5/2/19

Reynold Yu

Grad

Cao/Mount Lab

TBA